All Information About Muffler Rattling

A loose bracket, rubber hanger or connector, or one that is badly corroded, can allow a muffler to rattle when you accelerate or drive on bumpy roads, or even when the car is stationary and idling.

A loose muffler can allow excessive movement in other components as well and increase the stress on those parts, so it can become more than an annoying noise if left unattended. If the muffler is hanging lower than normal, there’s also a risk that it could be broken off by hitting a bump or going over railroad tracks.

Modern exhaust systems are usually made of aluminized steel or stainless steel, but that doesn’t mean they or the parts that hold the exhaust components in place last forever. Heat, debris, road salt and moisture can all cause rust in the exhaust system.

Though a muffler rattle might be fixed simply by tightening a couple of bolts or replacing a broken hanger, the corrosion might be bad enough on the muffler or neighboring parts that they will have to be replaced.

A rattle or banging noise from the exhaust system might not be an external problem. Baffles or other components inside of mufflers can come loose and cause internal rattles.

In addition, the muffler may not be the only cause or even the culprit. Brackets and bolts securing tailpipes, heat shields above catalytic converters and other components can come loose, and catalytic converters can develop internal rattles when they go bad.

Know More About Rearview Mirror

One of the most irritating occurrences for a driver is to lose their rear view mirror. Not lost exactly, just that it is no longer attached to the windshield. Besides being illegal and unsafe, not having a rear view mirror is a serious inconvenience to a driver. The good news is it is fairly easy and inexpensive to reattach the mirror.

The first thing to do is get all of your necessary supplies ready. A quick trip to the auto parts store will do nicely. Pick up a rearview mirror adhesive kit. It will have a strong glue vial and a supply of accelerant to speed up the glue curing process.

A small Allen wrench and thin, razorblade scraper will be helpful as well. Get together some odds and ends from the house too. Masking tape and, if the weather is chilly, a hair dryer or heat gun will be helpful.

Now that everything is ready it’s time to reattach the mirror. It’s a good idea to leave the car’s windows down during the process. The fumes from the glue can be a little overwhelming.

Use the scraper to remove any old glue from the windshield. Allowing the car windshield to warm up in the sun or warming the glass with the hair dryer or heat gun will loosen it as well.

It is usually pretty obvious where the rearview mirror should be placed due to residue from the original mirror. However if that is not the case use your tape measure to mark a place halfway across the windshield and about 4 inches from the headliner.

Make sure the area of glass that is to be home to your rearview mirror is clean of the old glue and dirt or oil. The base plate of mirror should be scraped and clean of residue as well. The old glue will prohibit the new adhesion from sticking properly.

The next step is to place the rearview mirror. Using the glue from the kit, apply an adequate amount to the clean glass. Remove the mounting base from the mirror with the Allen wrench.

Working with the mirror attached is cumbersome and awkward. Apply the accelerant to the base plate and allow the accelerant time to dry. Both surfaces are now prepped for adhesion.

You’re almost there. Liberally apply the glue to the back of the base plate and firmly press it onto the prepared spot on the inside of the windshield. Be sure to hold it in place for at least two minutes.

The base plate should be left alone for a 15-minute minimum and longer is even better. If it is convenient letting the adhesive cure overnight is an excellent idea.

After the base plate has had adequate time to dry, rescrew the mirror to its base. Don’t be tempted to test the hold and pull on the rearview mirror. It will hold just fine as it is and with any luck, the job will last for the life of the car.

How To Repair Car Windshield

If your car window has been cracked by a rock, you don’t have to replace your entire window. You can just repair it at a fraction of the price that you’d pay if you were to report it to your insurance company or if your insurance agent was to send you to an inexpensive repairman.

The easiest types of cracks to fix are small bulls-eye holes or cracks caused by pebbles or stones. Depending on the size of the crack in your windshield, about $60 is the average amount you will spend on repairing it, compared to about $300 to replace an entire windshield. Or, you can find a car windshield repair kit, which runs around $12.95, through the Internet, a local auto parts store, or a local windshield repair company. Prices may vary at different locations. There are several on the market for under $10 that claim to fix most types of glass damage, from windshields to headlights. It is nearly invisible and uses a professional resin injector system and UV cure epoxy to allow repairs to be done in 20 minutes. Other car windshield repair kits use special vacuum and pressure settings in an individual spring-loaded injector with just one seal to exchange.

If your crack is substantial, searching the yellow pages in the phone book or doing an online search can help you find car windshield repair companies. You can have one of these windshield repair companies fix your vehicle in the parking lot while you’re at work or in your own driveway at home. The mobile car windshield wizards have a process to their magic: starting by drilling tiny holes in the glass, a special glazing technique is used to fill the cracks with a substance that stops cracks from dispersing when it hardens. Like a liquid resin that a dentist would use to repair your teeth, it is hardened with ultraviolet light. The only sign that your windshield has been repaired is a small blur where the crack was, but sometimes even that can’t be seen.

Besides the money you save, there are a number of reasons to consider repairing your cracked windshield by yourself. If you have a rare vehicle with a unique windshield, it could be difficult to find the exact size and shape windshield that you need, and sometimes it is difficult to find someone who will work well with you.

You should consider fixing your cracked windshield if you have even a small spot, because little cracks start to spread and turn into large cracks. A vehicle’s windshield is also an important safety factor in that it supports the roof of the vehicle, keeping it from caving in on itself in the case of an accident. Not only that, but if the crack is in the view of the driver, it could obstruct or distract from the other cars and passengers on the road. The bonus side to knowing how to perform your own car windshield repair is that not many people take the time to learn the skill, and many people utilize car windshield repair kits to start a business repairing car windshields for other people.

Substance Abuse and Oral health

Abusing drugs and/or alcohol has its aspect outcomes, which are not plenty to be desired, physically, emotionally and/or mentally. even though, with respects to oral fitness, drug and alcohol abuse can take pretty the toll. The affects of addiction can not most effective purpose visual deterioration of the mouth and its workings, but might also cause similarly research chemical for sale diseases within the frame. enamel begin to break down, and form cavities. it is also regularly the case, that if no longer dealt with, or if the abuse of meth or alcohol does now not cease, an individual can also lose their tooth through the years.

studies was carried out on a group of individuals that were drug and/or alcohol addicts. a number of the drugs that the individuals were hooked on, blanketed that of cocaine, marijuana, meth and opium. whilst evaluating their oral health to that in their lives prior to their addiction, the consequences were devastating. maximum all individuals had misplaced teeth, or were at the verge of intense infections. even as others were tormented by coronary heart problems, at once referring to the bad circumstance of the health of their mouth.

Of all individuals tested, people who were addicted to meth suffered the worst deterioration of all. The components in manufactured meth may additionally include but are not constrained to acids, lithium, ether and lye. All of which may be damaging to the oral, and average fitness of a meth person. some of the commonplace oral fitness troubles that stand up with the abuse of meth can also include but aren’t limited to:

while blood vessels destroy down or are blocked by the use of meth, the teeth and gums lack the blood that they want to easy themselves efficiently. this can bring about tooth decay, teeth falling out, rotting gums 4 aco dmt buy heart contamination. when abusing meth and/or alcohol, much less saliva is produced in the mouth. Blockages of the salivary glands also are generally obvious. As saliva is a natural neutralizer for acidic ingredients which includes soda, citrus and plaque – while there is much less of it, the mouth suffers.

even though the influences that capsules and/or alcohol have at the mouth are often seen, many are unclear as to what the direct causes are. if you or a person you realize is affected by an unhealthy drug or alcohol dependency, contact a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center at earliest convenience. serious oral fitness issues can develop into even extra excessive illnesses and diseases at some stage in the frame. it’s never too overdue to enhance the health of a chum, member of the family, or your self, these days.

Learn More About Radiator and Cooling System Problems

If steam is pouring from under your hood, a temperature warning light is glowing bright red on your dashboard or the needle in the temperature gauge is cozying up to the High mark, it’s time to pull off the road and shut down the engine before it fries from overheating.

Any indication of overheating is a serious matter, so the best course of action is to shut down the engine to prevent further damage. Driving a car with an overheated engine can warp cylinder heads and damage internal engine parts such as valves, camshafts and pistons.

Even letting the engine cool for an hour and topping off the radiator with a 50-50 mix of antifreeze and water may not fix what’s wrong. Here are some reasons an engine will overheat:

  • The coolant level could be extremely low, because of long-term neglect or because a leak has developed in the radiator or radiator hoses. Coolant circulates inside the engine block to cool it, and the leak might be in the block, or from the water pump or heater hoses. Old coolant loses its corrosion-inhibiting properties, allowing rust to form and ultimately causing damage.
  • The thermostat that allows coolant to circulate may be stuck in the closed position or a clog may have developed, perhaps from debris in the cooling system.
  • The engine cooling fan has stopped working or the radiator’s cooling fins are clogged with debris so that the air flow that reduces the coolant temperature is restricted.
  • The radiator cap has gone bad and no longer maintains enough pressure in the cooling system, allowing coolant to boil over (engines normally operate at about 210 to 220 degrees Fahrenheit).
  • The head gasket that seals the gap between the cylinder head and engine block may have failed, allowing coolant to leak inside the combustion chambers. The steam should be visible coming out of the exhaust system.
  • The water pump has stopped working or the belt that drives it broke or is slipping and not pumping enough coolant.
  • You’ve been towing a 5,000-pound trailer with a vehicle equipped to tow only 2,000 pounds, exceeding the vehicle’s cooling capacity. (You probably also strained the transmission.)

Checking your engine coolant level in the overflow tank on a regular basis can help avoid disasters. If you have to keep topping off the coolant, that’s an indication of a small leak that should be taken care of before it becomes a major one. Having your coolant tested and the entire system inspected by a mechanic every couple of years is an even better way to prevent cooling system disasters.

All Information About Synthetic Oil

If your car’s owner’s manual says it does, you do.

For many consumers, whether to spend extra money for synthetic oil for an oil change is a difficult question to answer.

Manufacturers of synthetic oil promise more miles and better performance when compared with conventional motor oil, but it comes at a higher cost — sometimes twice as much per oil change. Is it worth the extra money?

Typically, high-performance vehicles will be more likely to require synthetic oil, as will vehicles that have a turbocharged or supercharged engine. However, if your vehicle does not require synthetic oil, the choice is trickier – and there is no clear answer.

Synthetic oil generally resists breaking down for longer than conventional motor oil (typically 7,500 miles to 10,000 miles, sometimes up to 15,000 miles, as opposed to 3,000 miles to 7,500 miles for conventional oil). That makes the extra cost a wash, if you have half the number of oil changes, but each one costs you twice as much. Other touted benefits include cleaner engines, better flow in cold temperatures, better protection when it’s hot outside and better performance with turbocharged engines.

There are also synthetic blends. As the name implies, these are blends of synthetic and conventional oils. They straddle a middle ground — they cost more than conventional oils but less than full synthetics, and are said to last longer than conventional oils but not quite as long as synthetics — but again, that’s a hard number to pin down since manufacturers are vague with their claims. An independent testing lab we spoke with said that synthetics often didn’t perform much better than conventional oils do.

Still, older engines may benefit from synthetics because it is less likely to form sludge.

If your car doesn’t require synthetic oil you should perform a cost/benefit analysis, but that can be difficult to do due to vague claims made by manufacturers. There may be no reason to spend more on synthetic oil, except for peace of mind.

How To Balancing A Tire

Smooth driving is a balancing act that requires getting the wheels and tires to rotate at high speeds without vibrations. That’s not a slam dunk; a dirty little secret about wheels and tires is that they usually aren’t perfectly round, even when brand new. What’s more, their weight often isn’t evenly distributed, so they’re heavier in some spots than others.

Either issue can cause annoying vibrations. Out-of-balance tires can also cause rapid tire or suspension wear, so it’s not just about ride comfort.

That is why when new tires are mounted on wheels they’re spin-balanced to detect vibrations. Some vibrations can be eliminated by rotating the tire on the wheel so the heavy or “high” spot is in a different location that better matches up with the wheel. Small weights are attached to the wheels with adhesives or clips to counteract the heavy spots and provide a smooth ride. Over time, though, the weights can fall off. If that happens to a front wheel, you may feel vibrations through the steering wheel that typically become more pronounced as vehicle speed increases.

Many tire dealers include free lifetime rotation and balancing with new tires (something you should ask about before buying). Tire rotation is when the vehicle’s tires are removed and reattached at a different position to ensure they wear evenly, which should be done every 5,000 to 7,500 miles on most vehicles, or according to the automaker’s recommendation.

Many consumers neglect the balancing part and have their tires rotated only periodically. If balancing was included with the tires, it would be wise to remind the shop to check the balance at the same time. Even if balancing costs extra, it’s a good idea to have it checked at least every two years, or more often in areas where roads are not well-maintained.

Vibrations can also be caused by a bent wheel, a damaged tire (which won’t be fixed by balancing), worn suspension parts or worn wheel bearings, so balancing the wheels and tires may not eliminate all vibrations.

Tires and wheels are balanced before being attached to the vehicle by spinning them on a balancing machine that identifies heavier or stiffer spots that cause vibrations. Some tire dealers and repair shops use “road force” balancing machines that simulate the weight and forces applied to tires and wheels during driving conditions. They say this method provides more accurate and detailed readings that allow more precise balancing.

All About Air Conditioner At Car

The air-conditioning condenser is a radiator positioned between the car’s grille and the engine-cooling radiator in which the gaseous refrigerant sheds heat and returns to a liquid state. The liquid refrigerant flows to the evaporator inside the dashboard, where it cools the cabin. Is your car not cool enough for you, at least temperature-wise? It might result from a clogged air-conditioning condenser or disabled cooling fan. A leak in the condenser also will result in a loss of refrigerant.

How do I know if my air-conditioning condenser has gone bad?
Well, it’ll be warmer than you want, or your windows will be foggy. If refrigerant leaks, the air conditioner won’t spit out much cold air, if any. Leaks can be located by adding an ultraviolet dye to the refrigerant. Air-conditioning output also can be diminished by crud that builds up on the front of the condenser, and cleaning the condenser may restore some performance.

How often should I replace my air-conditioning condenser?
As with other parts of the air-conditioning system, the condenser generally doesn’t need servicing as long as the system is producing cold air. Some mechanics recommend periodically inspecting the condenser for signs of damage or corrosion and doing an external cleaning or internal flush if needed.

Why do I have to replace my air-conditioning condenser?
Because it’s an integral part of your air-conditioning system, and you won’t be comfortable, or be able to see, if it’s broken. Some condensers can be cleaned externally with a hose, and others can be cleared of sludge with an internal flush, but many mechanics recommend replacing a condenser that is clogged or corroded.

Know More About Suspension Problems

Suspension components, including springs, shock absorbers (or struts on some vehicles), anti-roll bars, control arms and other parts, are like combat troops serving on the frontlines: They take a pounding daily from potholed streets, railroad tracks, rain, snow, road salt, gravel, all manner of dirt and grime, and the occasional piece of scrap metal or other debris that drivers see too late to avoid.

Related: AAA: Potholes Are a Money Pit for Motorists

Under those conditions, just about any suspension component can be damaged or worn out from years of abuse. How can you tell? There’s a number of symptoms and noises that should be your wakeup call to see a car doctor. Here are some common issues you’re likely to encounter:

  • Poor wheel alignment: The wheels have to be pointed in the right direction (literally) and aligned for toe-in, camber and caster. If they aren’t, your steering won’t be centered when you’re going straight and tire wear will increase. Wheels get knocked out of alignment by potholes and curbs, but getting the wheels aligned won’t fix damaged springs, controls arms or other parts that affect alignment. When you buy new tires, it’s a good idea to have the alignment checked so suspension issues don’t shorten tread life.
  • Shock absorbers: They really should be called “dampers,” and when they wear out, you should notice more bouncing after a bump and a whole lot of shaking going on over rough roads because they can’t keep the tires planted on the pavement. Shocks contain fluid that dampens the bouncing, and once they start to leak, performance will deteriorate.
  • Springs: These are what hold the weight of the car, and as they wear they can sag or break. If your car is on level ground but one corner is lower than the others, that’s a sign of a damaged spring. You can measure the height of the corners to confirm your visual cue. You might also hear clunking noises over bumps, and the car may not corner with confidence because a damaged spring can’t control the weight it’s supporting.
  • Ball joints: These are pivot points that attach the suspension to the wheels, and they absorb some of the shock from up-down movement and rotate as the steering angle changes. You’ll know they need replacing when you can hear them squeaking and creaking, especially when turning. You’ll know you waited too long if a ball joint breaks and suspension parts are dragging on the pavement. A mechanic can tell if they need replacing by the amount of wheel movement they can force by hand or, in some cases, by wear indicators on the ball joints.
  • Control arms: These are hinges that hold the wheels to the frame and connect the steering to the wheels, so when you turn one, the other responds. Lower control arm bushings are more prone to wear out on front-wheel-drive cars than on rear-wheel-drive cars. Bushings are rubber and/or metal parts that help absorb shock, and when they wear, they can cause ride and handling problems and accelerate tire wear. So can a bent control arm. Signs of wear include clunks or rattles — because the wheels move back and forth in acceleration and braking — and loose, imprecise steering.

Know More About The PCV Valve

The positive crankcase ventilation system was one of the earliest emission-control devices. It draws leftover combustion gases from the crankcase (the oil pan and bottom of the engine) and routes them back into the engine, where they’re burned in the combustion chambers instead of escaping into the atmosphere.

The PCV system is seldom listed as a maintenance item, but it can cause performance and emissions problems. A valve that’s supposed to regulate the flow of these gases is the heart of most PCV systems (some newer vehicles don’t have a valve). If the valve doesn’t open and close on schedule, or if any part of the system clogs, the result can be a rough idle, sluggish acceleration or increased oil consumption.

The PCV valve is usually mounted in a grommet on a valve cover, at the end of a hose or tube. One way to check whether a PCV valve is functioning is to remove it and shake it. If you can hear a metallic rattling noise, it’s likely in good working order.

Whether an engine has a PCV valve or not, a hose or tube in the PCV system may become clogged from built-up sludge, or a vacuum hose may leak, so it pays to inspect the entire system, clean it if needed and test the valve for air flow.

A clogged PCV system or inoperative valve can increase oil consumption because pressure builds when the vapors in the crankcase aren’t allowed to flow into the combustion chambers. That additional pressure can force oil past seals and gaskets. If the valve is stuck in the open position, or there’s a leak in the system, that will allow too much air into the engine and throw off the air-fuel mixture, likely triggering the check engine light.

Though it’s not listed in the maintenance schedule in most vehicles, the PCV system should be inspected periodically to make sure it’s still in good condition, especially if engine performance has deteriorated.

Replace An Accessory Drive Belt

Most vehicles have a rubber belt on the front of the engine that drives accessories such as the air-conditioning compressor, power steering pump and alternator. If this accessory drive belt (also called a V or serpentine belt) breaks, the battery won’t get charged, the air conditioner won’t blow cold air and the power steering will go out. In addition, if the belt drives the water pump, the engine could overheat.

Most manufacturers call for periodic inspection of the belt as part of scheduled maintenance, but few list a specific replacement interval, and inspection intervals vary widely.

Mercedes-Benz, for example, says to inspect the belt every two years or 20,000 miles, while Volkswagen says to check it every 40,000 miles. On most Ford vehicles, the manufacturer says to start inspecting it after 100,000 miles and then every 10,000 miles. On many GM vehicles, the first recommended inspection is at 150,000 miles or 10 years.

Though these belts often last many years, they can become cracked or frayed and need to be replaced. That’s why they should be inspected at least annually on vehicles that are more than a few years old. In addition, if a belt needs to be replaced, the pulleys and tensioners that guide the belt should be inspected to determine if they caused damage other than normal wear.

A belt that isn’t cracked or frayed may look like it’s in good shape, but grooves on the hidden side may be worn enough that the belt slips on the pulleys that drive the accessories. That will cause problems in systems that rely on the belt to keep things humming. For example, a slipping drive belt may cause the alternator to work intermittently or at reduced power, and the battery won’t get fully recharged as a result, perhaps triggering a warning light.

Another sign of a worn belt is a squealing noise under acceleration. That could indicate that the belt is slipping because of wear, a belt tensioner is loose or a pulley is out of alignment.

Most modern vehicles use belts made from ethylene propylene diene monomer, a synthetic rubber that lasts longer than older types of engine belts. Most belt manufacturers estimate the typical lifespan of an EPDM belt to be 50,000 to 60,000 miles, and some say it’s more than 100,000 miles. However, it can be hard to tell how worn one is with just a visual check because EPDM belts are less likely to crack or lose chunks of rubber than other types. They should be inspected by a professional.

Car Battery in a New Car

Though battery problems are often associated with cold weather, Consumer Reports magazine says heat is a bigger enemy of car batteries and will take a bigger toll on performance and reserve capacity. The magazine recommends that vehicle owners in hotter parts of the country have their car battery tested after two years of ownership and then every year after. Those who live in colder areas can wait four years to test performance and capacity, and then every year after.

“Heat kills batteries,” according to John Banta, a Consumer Reports project leader and part of the team that tests batteries for the magazine. “Many times in cold climates your battery fails to start your car on a below-freezing day. The reason this happens is that the heat of the past summers has weakened your battery. When you use it in the cold, the starter requires more electrical current to turn over the cold engine with its thickened oil.”

Testing a battery’s performance and reserve (or amp-hour) capacity is not just a matter of seeing whether it will hold a charge (or checking the electric eye found on some batteries to see if it is green), so testing is best done by an auto technician.